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All-Reviews.com Top 50 Songs*:
for the 1st week of December, 2001

*based on airplay at alternative, pop and rock radio stations a cross the nation (reviews by LarryG)

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(songs 1-25)

  1. Coldplay-Trouble    (up 1 position)      buy it!
    Coldplay's Parachutes is a nice, good sounding record. Chris Martin's singing is appealing modest. Trouble, Parachutes' third chart hit, is a good example of Martin's unassuming charm. On Trouble, Martin apologizes for "all the stupid things I've done" swearing, "I never meant to do you wrong." Trouble's music is sweet and inobtrusive with a good piano, elegant line.

  2. Train-Something More    (down 10 positions)      buy it!
    It's easy to write off Train as a boring, if tuneful, yuppie band but they sometimes do fairly interesting things withing a pop context. Something More resembles late period psychedelic Beatles or, more accurately, the hundreds of songs other bands have modeled on later Beatles music. As the strings get bigger and the song just repeats itself, Train's easy listening tendencies become more obvious. Still, Something More, from the Drops Of Jupiter CD, is tuneful and it gets a decent edge from an unrushed pace and a good, dense texture with a thick bass line. On Something More, Pat Monahan is depressed and ready to move on from a relationship with a woman who's never satisfied.

  3. Kid Rock-Forever    (unchanged)      buy it!
    His new CD is called Cocky but Kid Rock seems defensive on Forever. Perhaps knowing that his rhymes are pretty stupid, Kid Rock anticipated criticism, warning "do not hate or question the music I make." He brags "I ain't changed nothing" but that's part of the problem with Forever. It's a retread of his previous work with little new inspiration. He's bragged before about his skills at mixing rock and hip hop and how he's "got money like Fort Knox." Still, while Kid Rock will never recapture his Devil Without A Cause/Bawitdaba success, there will always be some attracted to a proudly white trashy guy who confidently does old school rhymes. And there is a simple appeal to Forever's basic beat and grinding guitar line.

  4. Nelly Furtado-Turn Off The Light    (down 6 positions)      buy it!
    On her second single from the Whoa, Nelly CD, the Portugese-Canadian singer is again a cool, refreshing presence on pop radio. Turn Off The Light has an even looser feel than I'm Like A Bird. Furtado's vocal is easy and appealing. Turn Off The Light has a trippy feel with ringing synths and record scratching but it also has good, tight beats. On Turn Off The Light, Furtado says she acting tough after a breakup but when she's on her own at night she's troubled and lonely.

  5. Hoobastank-Crawling In The Dark    (up 1 position)      buy it!
    Crawling In The Dark, from the L.A. band's self titled major label debut, is another song that sounds pieced together from other successful rock songs. It's got Korn style atmospheric guitar, a serious, troubled singer, big power chords and a vague Faith No More/Limp Bizkit style hip hop sensibility. But Crawling In The Dark also has good tempo shifts and it's more interesting than much of the similarly imitative music on rock radio. I like the way the song speeds up and gains energy on the chorus. Doug Robb keeps things from getting too draggy as he sings about "looking for the answer" and trying to find direction in life.

  6. Tool-Lateralus    (up 6 positions)      buy it!
    After seven months, Schism has finally ended its chart run, only to be replaced by the title track from Tool's Lateralus CD. Lateralus is a similarly angry, sprawling work. I don't find Lateralus as striking as Schism. Lateralus is typical of Tool's work as it combines art rock and heavy metal. Lateralus methodically moves forward, starting with percussive atmosphere and building into a harder sound with crunching power chords. Maynard James Keenan's howls with a great sense of meaning. But Lateralus does have good intensity and texture and Lateralus' lyrics are actually kind of hopeful. Keenan castigates himself for missing opportunities by ignoring his intuition and overthinking and overanalyzing. He urges himself to "cross the line" and look to life's "infinite possibilities."

  7. Shakira-Whenever Wherever    new to music chart      buy it!
    I don't totally understand why Whenever Wherever, from the Colombian soap opera and singing star's Laundry Service CD, has become a big hit in the U.S. Is it because of MTV's steady play of the cheesy video showing Shakira emerging from the sea then writhing seductively in various geographic settings? Is it the harbinger of the next wave of crossovers as Latin radio's audience grows ever larger? With a repetitive beat and Shakira's theatrical, slightly hysterical voice, Whenever Wherever has some of the broad, fakey sound that turns me off a lot of mainstream Latin pop. It also does have the genre's big, loose charm and a flute sound that supplies an exotic touch. Whenever Wherever doesn't take itself too seriously. The lyrics about being willing to travel the globe to keep a relationship with a distant lover include the line: "lucky that my breasts are small and humble so you don't confuse them with mountains."

  8. Blink 182-Stay Together For The Kids    (up 5 positions)      buy it!
    Blink 182 have easily shown a juvenile mentality on their stupider songs but they also are able to depict youthful inner turmoil in a real seeming, unshowy way. Stay Together For The Kids, from the Take Off Your Pants and Jacket CD, is even more basic than Enema Of The Stateís Adamís Song as it simply illustrates the effect of a coupleís troubled relations on their kid. The different personalities of Blinkís frontmen nicely illustrate the sides of the troubled kidís mind. Mark Hoppus sincerely croons the verses and Tom DeLonge angrily yells the chorus. Stay Together For The Kids is similar to other Blink songs. Like on all their singles, they take an instrumental break to build the intensity before doing the verse one last time. But the band create a moving grandeur by slowing things down and building emotion as DeLongeís guitar and Travis Barkerís drums gain in power.

  9. Destiny's Child-Emotion    (up 2 positions)      buy it!
    If you've seen Destiny's Child on an awards or benefit show, you've probably seen them doing a good, short a capella thing. The message is clear: we're not just a studio creation, we can really sing. Emotion, the third single from the Survivor CD, is a similar display of the ladies' vocal talents. The backing is minimal, mostly from an acoustic guitar and a very simple beat. The singing stands up well on its own and is mostly not overly showy . The harmonies are smooth, tight and good. The thing about Destiny's Child's version is that it's so polite and sedate that it's not much more than a vocal exercise. The Bee Gees' crazy high pitched intensity gave the original undeniable drama. It also fit better with the song's emotional lyrics, with their lines about being "caught up in sorrow" and crying "me a river", about how "heartache lives on inside" since a breakup.

  10. Tantric-Mourning    (up 8 positions)      buy it!
    Mourning is the third chart hit from the debut CD by the musicians who have recaptured success after getting kicked out of Days Of The New while Travis Meeks' second version of Days Of The New has sunk without a trace. It's a shame that Tantric's tale of resurrection isn't accompanied by better music. Tantric seem like decent musicians but they're making very standard angry rock. Hugo Ferreira, the singer the ex-Days picked, is just another intense, deep sub-Vedder voice. The lyric starts by claiming he's learned about himself and can deal with another woman hurting him but soon accuses her for "all the lies" and how she "conned me into thinking that all I had was you."

  11. Alicia Keys-Fallin'    (down 4 positions)      buy it!
    Alicia Keys' Songs In A Minor is probably the most remarkable success story of 2001. Keys' only previous credits were a couple soundtrack songs and a little backup work but her CD debuted at number one and has been near the top of the charts ever since. Fallin' is striking on first listen and goes a long way in explaining the CD's success. Unlike the overproduced work of other female pop singers, Fallin' shows the confidence to let Keys' singing stand on its own and her strong, sexy voice is up to the task. Fallin' has a good, minimal production. Strong backing vocals and Keys' piano playing create a classic, soulful sound. There isn't much to the lyric, about the confusion of a relationship that brings lots of pleasure and pain, but its simplicity fits the song's stylish, retro feel.

  12. N Sync-Gone    (down 3 positions)      buy it!
    N Sync risked alienating a large number of their fans with Pop, the title track and first single from their new CD, and its cold, harsh sub-Michael Jackson sound, paranoid boasts and ridiculous challenge to critics who don't respect them. The second single plays it safe, letting heartthrob Justin Timberlake pour his heart out about his pain and longing for a lost love while the rest of the boys harmonize behind him. The vocals are nicely restrained and quite good. The music, acoustic guitars and strings, is so tastefully minimal that it's a little boring.

  13. Bush-The People That We Love    (down 8 positions)      buy it!
    Out of concern for our delicate post-September 11 sensibility, the first single from Bush's Golden State CD has been renamed. Speed Kills is now called The People That We Love, even though the song has always clearly been about the emotional damage caused in relationships, rather than any literal violence or death. People That We Love, like all of Gavin Rossdale's work, is ever so serious. But it also shows Rossdale's talent for making tight, intense rock with a good, edgy energy as he sings, over driving guitars, about how we "destroy the world we took so long to make."

  14. Usher-U Got It Bad    (up 6 positions)      buy it!
    Like U Remind Me, the first hit from Usher's 8701 CD, U Got It Bad is competent, familiar easy R&B. Producer Jermaine Dupri gives U Got It Bad a smooth, unexciting sound with a steady, restrained beat and tasteful touches of guitar. Usher Raymond has a presence that's helped him find success in music and movies but his voice, while pleasant, is unremarkable and certainly not among the best of the sensitive male ladykillers who have topped the charts over the years. On U Got It Bad Usher assures people who love obsessively that he's one of them and their behavior is fine.

  15. Fuel-Last Time    (up 7 positions)      buy it!
    On Last Time, Fuel are in a harder rocking mode than on the three previous chart hits from their Something Like Human CD. Last Time has a tougher rock guitar and Carl Bell angrily yells the lyrics with great intensity. Still, Last Time has the slick, superficial, calculated feel of the other songs from Something Like Human. Bell promises in Last Time's pretentious lyrics that he will soon leave an addictive, controlling woman.

  16. John Mellancamp-Peaceful World    (down 2 positions)      buy it!
    More than two decades into his career, John Mellancamp mostly works in adult contemporary mode but he still has an uncanny knack of making appealing singles. As on his good cover of Wild Night, Mellancamp works with a distinctive African American singer and produces a very likable result. Mellancamp is sometimes stupidly self righteous, pretentiously speaking lines decrying hypocrites and saying he's "sick and tired of being politically correct" but India.Arie's vocals provide a nice balance. They're serious but warm and unaffected and right for the song's utopian message. The music on Peaceful World, from Mellancamp's Cuttin Heads CD is also good, with a loose, edgy beat.

  17. Ryan Adams-New York, New York    (unchanged)      buy it!
    New York, New York is from Gold, the former Whiskeytown frontman's second solo record. Adams' music continues to evolve from alt country to more mainstream rock. New York, New York shows the different sides of Adams' sound. His loose, rapid fire delivery evokes a Dylan song like Tangled Up In Blue but New York, New York also resembles songs by The Allman Brothers and Billy Joel. New York, New York has gotten attention because of its eerie video, filmed September 7th, showing Adams singing in front of a view of New York's downtown skyline with the Twin Towers in the center of the shot. But New York, New York also deserves attention because it's a darn good song. It has a great, fun feel with buoyant guitar and keyboards. Adams' flood of words is very charming. On New York, New York, Adams pays tribute to his adopted home but decides that, since his memories of the city are so intertwined with those of the love that broke his heart, it's time to go.

  18. Jennifer Lopez-I'm Real    (down 2 positions)      buy it!
    Even with a synth riff that reminds me of The Hustle, the third hit from the J.Lo CD is effective dance pop. I'm Real has good rhythm and is less mechanical sounding than Lopez' last single Play. Lopez' voice is pleasant but bland and basically overwhelmed by the beats. The lyrics to I'm Real are fairly vapid. Lopez declares her realness uninterestingly, telling her man not to feel insecure or worry about what she's doing when she's not with him. MTV and some radio stations are now playing a "remix" of I'm Real, basically a new song with almost totally different lyrics and music. The new version, a duet with Ja Rule, was written by Ja Rule and appears on his Pain Is Love CD. It actually has a real feel that's been missing from Lopez' heavily produced music with a clear, relaxed sound of minimal synths and a good, basic beat, The lyrics are also more relaxed. They're riffs off the original that include the publicity grabbing request for "niggas" to "mind they biz."

  19. The Offspring-Defy You    new to music chart      buy it!
    Defy You, from the soundtrack of the movie Orange County, is in the slower, more standard rock vein of Offspring hits like Self Esteem and Gone Away. One of the problems when The Offspring slow down from their standard post punk pace is that it's easier to understand their lyrics. Defy You's message is typically simplistic, trying to rally the kids by vowing to overcome a society that tries to "push me around." Dexter Holland vows "you cannot stop us, you cannot bring us down." While Defy You is obvious and very basic it does pack the simple thrills of a classic hard rocker. The Offspring slowly grind through with a good, big beat and solid bass line. Holland's yell and Noodles' crunching chords on the chorus have a primal rock and roll power.

  20. Sevendust-Praise    (up 1 position)      buy it!
    Praise, from Sevendust's Animosity CD, is a fairly good model of dark hard rock. With harsh, rumbling guitars, it captures the threatening tone the band presumably seeks. Lajon Witherspoon is one of the best singers in hard rock and he has the appropriate agitated wail and doesn't go too far over the top. Still, Praise is pretty unpleasant stuff. Its anger and unnerving sound will keep it from having an audience beyond troubled male teens. Praise's lyrics have the paranoia and anger central to much recent hard rock. Witherspoon sings of an unnamed someone whose "hate for me is strong" and is "oblivious to all of my cries."

  21. Sum 41-In Too Deep    (down 6 positions)      buy it!
    Sum 41 continue to follow Blink 182's bratty but lovable punk popster formula. On In Too Deep, the second hit from the young Canadians' All Killer, No Filler CD, Sum 41 use the same basic guitar riff as they did on Fat Lip. At least this time they don't rap. In Too Deep is very simple but likable. The guitar sound is big and tight. There's nothing original or particularly smart about In Too Deep. But even more than Fat Lip, which vaguely wanted to be a youth rebellion anthem, In Too Deep has a lack of pretension and youthful good spirits that are hard to resist. In Too Deep's lyric seems young as well. It's about a guy overwhelmed by a woman who's never satisfied with their relationship.

  22. Saliva-Click Click Boom Boom    (down 3 positions)      buy it!
    Click Click Boom Boom, the second chart hit from Saliva's Every Six Seconds CD, isn't as goofy and derivative as Your Disease but it's still pretty goofy and derivative. Click Click Boom Boom has the Soundgarden meets Kid Rock mix of rapping and big beat with power chords that Limp Bizkit has so successfully sold to the male teens. Josey Scott angrily yells lyrics that share Fred Durst's combination of boasting and paranoia and lamely try to seem meaningful. Scott tells us how all his time "up in my room" has paid off in "a new style" that's "buck wild." The only part of Click Click Boom Boom I really like is his gratuitous shot at the "cryin' ass bitchin" of his fellow rockers' complaints about their troubled childhood.

  23. Toya-I Do    new to music chart      buy it!
    I Do, from the St. Louis singer's debut Toya CD, is fairly standard dance pop with a familiar story of a woman trying to entice "a six foot stallion with the story of a thug" that she sees on the dance floor. I Do isn't ground breaking but it does have a pretty interesting, steady sound with chiming effects and a minimal, percussive beat.

  24. Britney Spears-I'm A Slave For U    (unchanged)      buy it!
    On I'm A Slave For U, from the Britney CD, hot hip hop producers The Neptunes do what they can with Spears' limitations, smartly matching her thin, fake sounding but somewhat sexy voice with cold, synthetic but sultry backing. I'm A Slave's rubbery, clanging sounds and tight beat create an interesting, exotic feel. But after a few listens I'm A Slave seems like a gimmicky novelty and there's only so much The Neptunes can do with Britney's pinched, pouty voice. As for Britney, it's hard to blame her for working the sex angle hard these days; being sexy is clearly her best talent. But considering that she's a 20 year old millionaire, her new CD's "I'm not a girl but I'm not a woman" theme is somewhat ridiculous. It's a slightly desperate attempt to keep her preteen fans on board. I'm A Slave For U's imagines a world of people who "look at me like I'm a little girl" and claims dancing as an act of defiance. The lyrics are more about wanting to dance with a guy than being a slave to him.

  25. The Strokes-Last Nite    new to music chart      buy it!
    Quite a bit of hype, largely created by the British music press, surrounded the Strokes before they even had a record out. The hype is mostly justified by Is This It, one of the best CDs of 2001. Fans of late 70s/early 80s new wave are especially likely to enjoy Is This It's deft constructions. Julian Casablancas is appealingly confident as he channels cool alternative crooners like Lou Reed, Ian McCulloch and The Fall's Mark E. Smith while Nick Valersi lays down tight, jagged guitar lines reminiscent of Gang Of Four and, especially, Television's Richard Lloyd. Last Nite is kind of like Iggy Pop singing over Tom Petty's American Girl. With its steady, jaunty strumming and sturdy bass line, Last Nite is a good example of the Strokes' fun, basic sound. Last Nite is about having enough and walking away from a girlfriend who feels "so down" because no one understands her.

Songs 1-25


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